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  • 02 Apr 2018
    8 weeks post op. Seems like forever Well all the stitches have now dissolved out, that’s a relief because they were causing some discomfort So until yesterday I was generally pain free , then I decided to wear skinny jeans, big mistake. I moved to quickly and rubbed myself the wrong way so to speak. Now in pain , particularly in the toilet department. Hopefully that will naturally sort itself out over the next few days. If not a phone call to Brighton will be necessary Dilation has now gone from 3 to 2 times a day , which means I get an hour a day of my life back. I want to start running get again but that’s going to be at least a month away , but I am going to go swimming for the first time in 30 years. I am getting out the house for a couple of hours at a time , both driving and on the buses, although yesterday I was exhausted after clothes shopping and a beer at lunchtime. So much so , I am just going to relax around the house for the next few days to recover But the good news is I am now the owner of my first posh frock.  I will be there for the Stout and Porter pub crawl , although it might be shorter for me than originally hoped for.  I got a return trip to Brighton in a couple of weeks to get my first foo foo MOT. Hopefully that will give me the all clear to step up the exercise. Thanks to everyone I have bumped into in the last few weeks, you all help me to keep sane .   Simone x
    130 Posted by Simone Jo
  • 8 weeks post op. Seems like forever Well all the stitches have now dissolved out, that’s a relief because they were causing some discomfort So until yesterday I was generally pain free , then I decided to wear skinny jeans, big mistake. I moved to quickly and rubbed myself the wrong way so to speak. Now in pain , particularly in the toilet department. Hopefully that will naturally sort itself out over the next few days. If not a phone call to Brighton will be necessary Dilation has now gone from 3 to 2 times a day , which means I get an hour a day of my life back. I want to start running get again but that’s going to be at least a month away , but I am going to go swimming for the first time in 30 years. I am getting out the house for a couple of hours at a time , both driving and on the buses, although yesterday I was exhausted after clothes shopping and a beer at lunchtime. So much so , I am just going to relax around the house for the next few days to recover But the good news is I am now the owner of my first posh frock.  I will be there for the Stout and Porter pub crawl , although it might be shorter for me than originally hoped for.  I got a return trip to Brighton in a couple of weeks to get my first foo foo MOT. Hopefully that will give me the all clear to step up the exercise. Thanks to everyone I have bumped into in the last few weeks, you all help me to keep sane .   Simone x
    Apr 02, 2018 130
  • 26 Mar 2018
    https://www.standard.co.uk/news/world/experts-baffled-why-selfdriving-uber-didnt-stop-itself-before-hitting-woman-killed-in-arizona-crash-a3796146.html   This poses a legal dilemma, if this happened in the UK! if the car was'nt at fault    Quote  Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina law professor who studies autonomous vehicles, said: "The victim did not come out of nowhere. She's moving on a dark road, but it's an open road, so Lidar (laser) and radar should have detected and classified her" as a human. Their comments came after authorities released the harrowing dashcam video.   It cuts out just before the woman was struck as she walked onto a street in a suburb of Phoenix, Arizona, and the second part shows the reaction of the driver filmed from inside the car. Tempe Police Chief Sylvia Moir has said the SUV would probably not be found at fault, but the two experts said it appeared there was enough time and distance to avoid the collision.   Self-driving car experts today said they are mystified as to why a driverless vehicle struck and killed a woman. Two different experts said the Uber car, which had a backup driver sitting in it at the time of the crash, "should have detected" the woman victim on its built-in sensors. "It absolutely should have been able to pick her up," said Sam Abuelsmaid, an analyst for Navigant Research. Was the back up driver negligent, perhaps on his mobile phone, whatever, it's my considered opinion, that he could not be charged with an actual offence of driving without due care and attention,, speeding, driving in dangerous manner, he was'nt actually driving! Somebody has to take the blame, obviously with the level of investment involved, it's going to be the stand in, the person in the driving seat, or is the driving seat going to be renamed extra passenger seat, for someone that sometimes operates the car.   Whats the answer?   Can somebody be legally breath tested and penalised for being behind the wheel of a car when they are not in charge of the car, who pays the speeding fines for a ''driverless car''
  • https://www.standard.co.uk/news/world/experts-baffled-why-selfdriving-uber-didnt-stop-itself-before-hitting-woman-killed-in-arizona-crash-a3796146.html   This poses a legal dilemma, if this happened in the UK! if the car was'nt at fault    Quote  Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina law professor who studies autonomous vehicles, said: "The victim did not come out of nowhere. She's moving on a dark road, but it's an open road, so Lidar (laser) and radar should have detected and classified her" as a human. Their comments came after authorities released the harrowing dashcam video.   It cuts out just before the woman was struck as she walked onto a street in a suburb of Phoenix, Arizona, and the second part shows the reaction of the driver filmed from inside the car. Tempe Police Chief Sylvia Moir has said the SUV would probably not be found at fault, but the two experts said it appeared there was enough time and distance to avoid the collision.   Self-driving car experts today said they are mystified as to why a driverless vehicle struck and killed a woman. Two different experts said the Uber car, which had a backup driver sitting in it at the time of the crash, "should have detected" the woman victim on its built-in sensors. "It absolutely should have been able to pick her up," said Sam Abuelsmaid, an analyst for Navigant Research. Was the back up driver negligent, perhaps on his mobile phone, whatever, it's my considered opinion, that he could not be charged with an actual offence of driving without due care and attention,, speeding, driving in dangerous manner, he was'nt actually driving! Somebody has to take the blame, obviously with the level of investment involved, it's going to be the stand in, the person in the driving seat, or is the driving seat going to be renamed extra passenger seat, for someone that sometimes operates the car.   Whats the answer?   Can somebody be legally breath tested and penalised for being behind the wheel of a car when they are not in charge of the car, who pays the speeding fines for a ''driverless car''
    Mar 26, 2018 63
  • 23 Mar 2018
    It was a holiday, The sun was shining, the day was hot, It was a rare bank holiday indeed. Harry the electrician rolled over in bed, looked at the clock, it was 9am, first day off from work for over 6 months. He gazed at the vacant side of the bed and was mildly suprised, It was empty!,, he pondered for a moment remembering the last day off he had had. A morning of rampant sex with his GF, followed by a sumptuous breakfast, more rampant sex, Lunch in the garden a crate of lager followed by more rampant sex. Truly a memorable occasion which carried on in the same theme for the rest of that day. Suddenly the bedroom door was thrown open, his GF stood there in the skimpiest of knickers, holding a breakfast tray, bucks fizz,eggs, bacon, sausage tomatoes, the full English. Pot of coffee toast and marmalade. Wow he thought to himself this is going to be another truly memorable day. His GF placed the tray down over his legs, leant forward and kissed him leading him to believe that this was going to be one hell of a day. She backed off, saying with a lavicous smile ''Eat your breakfast, your going to need your strength'' As he tucked in, she enquired as to his intentions for the day, Smirking he replied ''I'm at your disposal for the whole day Oh lovely one, use me as you will'' ''Oh great, brilliant'' she says, adding ''You can put the new light fittings up in the bathroom, lounge and hallway'' It was like being hit by a truck, Harry lay there stunned at this vicious onslaught. He started recovering, reaching out to pull at her knickers, ''No! don't even go there'' she says your not wasting another bank holiday, those lights have been hanging round since the last day you had off'' Pushing the tray to one side, breakfast now forgotten, Harry says, ''Jesus Christ, its a bank holiday, do you realy think I am going to spend the first day off I have had in six months, doing something I am forced to do every day, to pay for your sexy underwear and not reap the benefeits'' She says, ''AND'' Harry says, ''sod this, I'm off to the snooker hall, I'll have lunch with my mates down the pub'' It was a balmy night as Harry staggered up to the front door, spending some considerable time trying to align his key with the lock that kept moving in the gentle evening breeze. Finally falling through the front door, fumbling for the light switch, suddenly, the hallway was flooded with a new luminance that he had not seen before, gazing up, he noted the new light fittings. resplendant in their new envioroment. Suddendly the need to relieve himself of the beer he had poured down his neck during the last 10 hours, he headed for the bathroom, pulled the cord and was amazed at such brilliance he had not encountered there before. Contemplating his willy and trying to pee in the right place, he pondered this miracle. Yes you guessed the new light fittings had magically installed themselves. Finally in a better frame of mind, he had lurid thoughts now of a night of drunken debauchery, innocently thinking that everything was now allright with the world. On opening the bedroom door, the first thing he saw was his lovely GF lay stark naked on the bed, dozing, a sweet happy smile on her face, as he gazed around he noticed the skimpy knickers and other feminine items of apparel strewn round the bedroom, then he noticed his GF was actually tied to the bed. WOW he thought to himself, this is great. He gently kissed her lips, she moaned, he nuzzled her breast with his lips, he gently carressed her belly button with his tongue, then kissed her knees, at this moment she awoke, ''Saying if it had of been a pub you bastard you would'nt have gone past it'' recoiling in shock, Harry in a fuddled confused moment, to difuse the situation asked ''I see you put up the new lights'' she replied ''ME! put up the lights, what are you some bloody idiot, The woman next door, her bother came to fix her lights, so I asked him to pop round and do ours'' ''What says Harry, how much did that king cost?' She through clenched teeth and with a look that could melt concrete she said ''nothing, I gave him the choice, Rampant perverted, sex or a roast dinner'' Harry said ''ooh good I am a bit peckish, what did you cook, any left over''? She says ''COOK! BLOODY COOK! YOU DO NOT THINK I WAS GOING TO SPEND THE ONE DAY OFF I HAVE HAD IN OVER A YEAR DOING SOMETHING I DO EVERY BLOODY DAY, DO YOU''? 
    127 Posted by Cristine Shye. BL. B/acc
  • It was a holiday, The sun was shining, the day was hot, It was a rare bank holiday indeed. Harry the electrician rolled over in bed, looked at the clock, it was 9am, first day off from work for over 6 months. He gazed at the vacant side of the bed and was mildly suprised, It was empty!,, he pondered for a moment remembering the last day off he had had. A morning of rampant sex with his GF, followed by a sumptuous breakfast, more rampant sex, Lunch in the garden a crate of lager followed by more rampant sex. Truly a memorable occasion which carried on in the same theme for the rest of that day. Suddenly the bedroom door was thrown open, his GF stood there in the skimpiest of knickers, holding a breakfast tray, bucks fizz,eggs, bacon, sausage tomatoes, the full English. Pot of coffee toast and marmalade. Wow he thought to himself this is going to be another truly memorable day. His GF placed the tray down over his legs, leant forward and kissed him leading him to believe that this was going to be one hell of a day. She backed off, saying with a lavicous smile ''Eat your breakfast, your going to need your strength'' As he tucked in, she enquired as to his intentions for the day, Smirking he replied ''I'm at your disposal for the whole day Oh lovely one, use me as you will'' ''Oh great, brilliant'' she says, adding ''You can put the new light fittings up in the bathroom, lounge and hallway'' It was like being hit by a truck, Harry lay there stunned at this vicious onslaught. He started recovering, reaching out to pull at her knickers, ''No! don't even go there'' she says your not wasting another bank holiday, those lights have been hanging round since the last day you had off'' Pushing the tray to one side, breakfast now forgotten, Harry says, ''Jesus Christ, its a bank holiday, do you realy think I am going to spend the first day off I have had in six months, doing something I am forced to do every day, to pay for your sexy underwear and not reap the benefeits'' She says, ''AND'' Harry says, ''sod this, I'm off to the snooker hall, I'll have lunch with my mates down the pub'' It was a balmy night as Harry staggered up to the front door, spending some considerable time trying to align his key with the lock that kept moving in the gentle evening breeze. Finally falling through the front door, fumbling for the light switch, suddenly, the hallway was flooded with a new luminance that he had not seen before, gazing up, he noted the new light fittings. resplendant in their new envioroment. Suddendly the need to relieve himself of the beer he had poured down his neck during the last 10 hours, he headed for the bathroom, pulled the cord and was amazed at such brilliance he had not encountered there before. Contemplating his willy and trying to pee in the right place, he pondered this miracle. Yes you guessed the new light fittings had magically installed themselves. Finally in a better frame of mind, he had lurid thoughts now of a night of drunken debauchery, innocently thinking that everything was now allright with the world. On opening the bedroom door, the first thing he saw was his lovely GF lay stark naked on the bed, dozing, a sweet happy smile on her face, as he gazed around he noticed the skimpy knickers and other feminine items of apparel strewn round the bedroom, then he noticed his GF was actually tied to the bed. WOW he thought to himself, this is great. He gently kissed her lips, she moaned, he nuzzled her breast with his lips, he gently carressed her belly button with his tongue, then kissed her knees, at this moment she awoke, ''Saying if it had of been a pub you bastard you would'nt have gone past it'' recoiling in shock, Harry in a fuddled confused moment, to difuse the situation asked ''I see you put up the new lights'' she replied ''ME! put up the lights, what are you some bloody idiot, The woman next door, her bother came to fix her lights, so I asked him to pop round and do ours'' ''What says Harry, how much did that king cost?' She through clenched teeth and with a look that could melt concrete she said ''nothing, I gave him the choice, Rampant perverted, sex or a roast dinner'' Harry said ''ooh good I am a bit peckish, what did you cook, any left over''? She says ''COOK! BLOODY COOK! YOU DO NOT THINK I WAS GOING TO SPEND THE ONE DAY OFF I HAVE HAD IN OVER A YEAR DOING SOMETHING I DO EVERY BLOODY DAY, DO YOU''? 
    Mar 23, 2018 127
  • 16 Mar 2018
    Big Cheif No bull, was walking in the mountains, with his youngest son, having quality time together, The son asked his father, ''Oh wise and venerable chief, why is my older brother called Brave Bear?'' The father replied, ''The day your brother was born, I was walking in the woods alone, contemplating life and wondering when the white eyes would give us back our land, when I came across a bear being attached by a pack of wolves, the bear fought bravely, sustaing some horrific wounds but prevailed and overcome the wolves winning the day, it was then that I heard your mothers cry as she gave birth, I took the bears courage to be a sign, hence your brothers name, he will be known all over this land for his courage and fortitude'' ''Oh father, you are so wise and deep'' said the son, ''Why is my sister called Laughing brook?'' well said the father ''I was sitting by the stream, the sound of the water passing over the rocks making a happy sound, thinking about how the white eyes have stolen our land, when again I heard the birthing cry of your mother, and in that time of uncertainty and tribulations, thought how happy the sound of the stream, so called your sister Laughing Brook she will be forever known in this land as the happy one'' ''Oh father you truly are a wonderful and deep thoughtful man'' said the son. The father replied, ''You will also learn wisdom being a great peace maker and a strong warrior fighting the cause of our nation, being known all over this land as ..... Two Dogs Shagging the peace maker along with your twin sister ...bitch on Heat'' 
  • Big Cheif No bull, was walking in the mountains, with his youngest son, having quality time together, The son asked his father, ''Oh wise and venerable chief, why is my older brother called Brave Bear?'' The father replied, ''The day your brother was born, I was walking in the woods alone, contemplating life and wondering when the white eyes would give us back our land, when I came across a bear being attached by a pack of wolves, the bear fought bravely, sustaing some horrific wounds but prevailed and overcome the wolves winning the day, it was then that I heard your mothers cry as she gave birth, I took the bears courage to be a sign, hence your brothers name, he will be known all over this land for his courage and fortitude'' ''Oh father, you are so wise and deep'' said the son, ''Why is my sister called Laughing brook?'' well said the father ''I was sitting by the stream, the sound of the water passing over the rocks making a happy sound, thinking about how the white eyes have stolen our land, when again I heard the birthing cry of your mother, and in that time of uncertainty and tribulations, thought how happy the sound of the stream, so called your sister Laughing Brook she will be forever known in this land as the happy one'' ''Oh father you truly are a wonderful and deep thoughtful man'' said the son. The father replied, ''You will also learn wisdom being a great peace maker and a strong warrior fighting the cause of our nation, being known all over this land as ..... Two Dogs Shagging the peace maker along with your twin sister ...bitch on Heat'' 
    Mar 16, 2018 84
  • 16 Mar 2018
    Posted on 6. April 2017 in Legal Gender Recognition, Press   Not that this applied to the UK,   No form of surgery is  legally required, but it proves just how diverse different EU member states have had their own GRA recognised by the EHRC something I have pointed out on numerous occasions when people have stated  ''according to Van Glock Germany etc etc we have the right to this and that and we don't have to do this and the other''  I stated in other  post's 2010, 2013, in my opinion enforced surgical procedures were a violation of ones basic human rights,  At the moment until a country member amends its own GRA, previously sanctioned by the HRC it is the law of that country until the HRC issues an order of compliance.   The European Court of Human Rights today found that the sterilisation requirement in legal gender recognition violates human rights. Setting the legal precedent for Europe, this decision will force the remaining 22 countries using the infertility requirement to change their laws. This historic decision is delivered in three joined cases against France about the lack of self-determination of transgender individuals in the country. A. P., E. Garçon and S. Nicot relied on Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights, i.e. the right to respect for private life “Today is a victory for trans people and human rights in Europe. This decision ends the dark chapter of state-induced sterilisation in Europe. The 22 states in which a sterilisation is still mandatory will have to swiftly end this practice. We are looking forward to supporting those and other countries in reforming their national legislation.” comments Julia Ehrt, Transgender Europe Executive Director. However, the Court denied that forced medical examinations ordered by the national court (E. Garcon v France) or a mental health diagnosis (A.P. v France) contradict the Convention. “It is regrettable that cruel and unnecessary medical examinations are seen to be in accordance with the European Convention on Human Rights. We will continue to raise awareness about the human rights abuses in the medical field that trans people are still systematically subjected to.”, says Richard Köhler, Senior Policy Officer of Transgender Europe. The three applicants have been struggling for almost a decade to have their gender identity recognised by the French state. Before October 2016, a person who wanted to have their gender identity legally recognised needed to prove infertility and genital surgery plus undergo excessive and lengthy discriminatory examinations. The Court found that requesting proof for “having undergone a sterilising operation or medical treatment resulting in a very high probability of infertility, amounts to a breach by the respondent State of its positive obligation to guarantee the right […] to respect for […] private life.” Thus, states cannot demand from a person seeking legal gender recognition to undergo any medical treatment that would most likely result in sterility. http://tgeu.org/echr_end-sterilisation/
  • Posted on 6. April 2017 in Legal Gender Recognition, Press   Not that this applied to the UK,   No form of surgery is  legally required, but it proves just how diverse different EU member states have had their own GRA recognised by the EHRC something I have pointed out on numerous occasions when people have stated  ''according to Van Glock Germany etc etc we have the right to this and that and we don't have to do this and the other''  I stated in other  post's 2010, 2013, in my opinion enforced surgical procedures were a violation of ones basic human rights,  At the moment until a country member amends its own GRA, previously sanctioned by the HRC it is the law of that country until the HRC issues an order of compliance.   The European Court of Human Rights today found that the sterilisation requirement in legal gender recognition violates human rights. Setting the legal precedent for Europe, this decision will force the remaining 22 countries using the infertility requirement to change their laws. This historic decision is delivered in three joined cases against France about the lack of self-determination of transgender individuals in the country. A. P., E. Garçon and S. Nicot relied on Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights, i.e. the right to respect for private life “Today is a victory for trans people and human rights in Europe. This decision ends the dark chapter of state-induced sterilisation in Europe. The 22 states in which a sterilisation is still mandatory will have to swiftly end this practice. We are looking forward to supporting those and other countries in reforming their national legislation.” comments Julia Ehrt, Transgender Europe Executive Director. However, the Court denied that forced medical examinations ordered by the national court (E. Garcon v France) or a mental health diagnosis (A.P. v France) contradict the Convention. “It is regrettable that cruel and unnecessary medical examinations are seen to be in accordance with the European Convention on Human Rights. We will continue to raise awareness about the human rights abuses in the medical field that trans people are still systematically subjected to.”, says Richard Köhler, Senior Policy Officer of Transgender Europe. The three applicants have been struggling for almost a decade to have their gender identity recognised by the French state. Before October 2016, a person who wanted to have their gender identity legally recognised needed to prove infertility and genital surgery plus undergo excessive and lengthy discriminatory examinations. The Court found that requesting proof for “having undergone a sterilising operation or medical treatment resulting in a very high probability of infertility, amounts to a breach by the respondent State of its positive obligation to guarantee the right […] to respect for […] private life.” Thus, states cannot demand from a person seeking legal gender recognition to undergo any medical treatment that would most likely result in sterility. http://tgeu.org/echr_end-sterilisation/
    Mar 16, 2018 53
  • 08 Mar 2018
    1. BackgroundLegal obligations and commissioning priority1.1 The Court of appeal ruled in 1999 that it is unlawful for NHS organisations tooperate anything amounting to a blanket ban on the funding of gender treatment(Burns, 2008).1.2 A Primary Care Trust is allowed to accord any treatment ‘low priority’. However, itis unlawful to use this as a ‘blanket policy’ whereby transsexualism becomeseffectively barred from treatment.1.3 Principle 3 of the NHS Plan (2000) expresses the need for non-discriminatorypractices and comprehensive involvement of individuals with their owntreatment plans. Implicit in this principle is the overriding need for properlyinformed consent of the person concerned before each stage of treatment.“The National Health Service of the 21st Century must be responsive tothe needs of different groups and individuals within society, andchallenge discrimination on the grounds of age, gender, ethnicity,religion, disability and sexuality. The NHS will treat patients asindividuals, with respect for their dignity. Patients and citizens willhave greater say in the NHS, and the provision of services will becentred on patients’ needs” (Principle 3, NHS Plan, 2000).1.4 It is only relatively recently that the Department of Health has made a specificcommitment to the care of those with gender identity issues who need toaccess clinical support."The Department of Health is committed to tackling gender inequalitieswithin the healthcare sector by recognising the specific health needs ofmen, women, and transgender people.... The Department's commitmentto create a patient-centred service which extends choice and isresponsive to all patients and users, especially with regards to the genderperspective, will ensure that any gender differences in treatment andaccess are eliminated". (Single Equality Scheme 2007-2010).1.5 It is clear that NHS commissioners have an obligation to provide services forpeople with gender dysphoria and that a policy for this should be formed inaccordance with the normal processes for policy formation and prioritisation. Referral Criteria5.1 The Primary Care Trust will only commission Gender Identity DisorderServices for patients who meet the following referral criteria:Inclusions• individuals with an initial diagnosis of transsexualism. A local consultantpsychiatrist who is not part of the gender identity service must have madethe initial diagnosis• patients who have written clinical support from their GP to ensure possiblefuture compliance with shared care arrangements if in place• the transsexual identity has been present persistently for at least twoyearsTreatment Pathway (Appendix A)Initial Assessment8.1 This period involves the continuation of the diagnostic assessment of thepatient.8.2 Psycho-social support should be available throughout the pathway.The Real Life Experience8.3 This is a period of time of two years, living in the gender role with which theindividual identifies, with the aim of assisting the patient and the professionalin decisions about how to proceed.8.4 The quality of real life experience is assessed through the patient’s ability to(Harry Benjamin Association, 2001):1. maintain employment, voluntary work, or education and training,2. acquire a legal gender appropriate first name3. demonstrate that people are aware that they are living in their newrole.Gender Reassignment Surgery (GRS)8.5 The treatment process for gender identity disorder includes a variety oftherapeutic options including surgical and non surgical procedures. Thetreatment pathway can include any of the following core treatments subject toexternal second opinion:Core Non Surgical Clinical Interventions• diagnostic assessment• psycho-social support• hormone therapy• pre- and post operative support from a professional with specialistknowledge of sex reassignment• voice skills therapy• Facial hair removal in transwomen, where clinically indicated toenable the period of real life experience8.6 The surgical interventions routinely funded under this policy can include oneor more of the following core procedures:Core Surgical Procedures for Gender Reassignment Surgery inTranswomen• penectomy• orchiectomy• vaginoplasty• clitoroplasty• labiaplasty• donor site hair removal on surgeon’s recommendationAny further procedure requested, including those listed below will require priorapproval. Cosmetic procedures require approval from the RestrictedTreatments Panel and are subject to the criteria of “exceptional clinical need”as defined in the Low Priority Treatments policy. Applications for otherprocedures should be made to the Exceptional Treatments Panel.Cosmetic Procedures• breast augmentation• reduction thyroid chondroplasty• rhinoplasty or other facial bone reduction• lipoplasty• blepharoplasty• face lift• liposuction• vocal chord surgery• Crico-thyroid approximation (only undertaken following speech &language therapy• hair removal/electrolysis (except as defined in core procedures)• procedures to decrease areas of baldness• skin resurfacingPost Operative Care8.8 Trans people are likely to have complex needs, be on lifelong hormonetherapy and may need to be monitored and have the services of amultidisciplinary team for the long term effects of such treatment such asthromboembolism, osteoporosis and cancer. Reassignment surgery usuallyleads to lower doses of hormones being required. GPs will be advised onhormone therapy by the tertiary centre, with referral of problems to the localtrust endocrinology services as required. Minor genitourinary tract problemscan be referred to the local urology department, but more complex problemsshould be referred to the specialist centre where reassignment surgery tookplace. However, both these issues will be part of normal treatment or carepathways managed by the Primary Care Trust.Reversal of Gender Reassignment Surgery8.9 The Primary Care Trust will not routinely provide funding for reversal ofGender Reassignment Surgery. Gender reassignment therapy/surgery isprovided following rigorous assessment of individual eligibility and readiness.This is intended to ensure that unsuitable patients are not offered surgery,leading to post operative regret.8.10 Revisions or repairs to surgery undertaken outside the NHS, wherever it hasoccurred, will not be approved or funded by the Primary Care Trust and thiswill include but not be exclusive to:• surgical revisions for psychological reasons• surgical revisions for cosmetic reasonsIn line with NHS co-funding guidance The Primary Care Trust will not cofund procedures nor will it support private non-core procedures being carriedout at the same time as core NHS funded procedures. This ensures there is aclear separation with regards to funding and liability. ____________________________________  Cristine Jennifer Shye B.acc. BL (GS Admin) 
  • 1. BackgroundLegal obligations and commissioning priority1.1 The Court of appeal ruled in 1999 that it is unlawful for NHS organisations tooperate anything amounting to a blanket ban on the funding of gender treatment(Burns, 2008).1.2 A Primary Care Trust is allowed to accord any treatment ‘low priority’. However, itis unlawful to use this as a ‘blanket policy’ whereby transsexualism becomeseffectively barred from treatment.1.3 Principle 3 of the NHS Plan (2000) expresses the need for non-discriminatorypractices and comprehensive involvement of individuals with their owntreatment plans. Implicit in this principle is the overriding need for properlyinformed consent of the person concerned before each stage of treatment.“The National Health Service of the 21st Century must be responsive tothe needs of different groups and individuals within society, andchallenge discrimination on the grounds of age, gender, ethnicity,religion, disability and sexuality. The NHS will treat patients asindividuals, with respect for their dignity. Patients and citizens willhave greater say in the NHS, and the provision of services will becentred on patients’ needs” (Principle 3, NHS Plan, 2000).1.4 It is only relatively recently that the Department of Health has made a specificcommitment to the care of those with gender identity issues who need toaccess clinical support."The Department of Health is committed to tackling gender inequalitieswithin the healthcare sector by recognising the specific health needs ofmen, women, and transgender people.... The Department's commitmentto create a patient-centred service which extends choice and isresponsive to all patients and users, especially with regards to the genderperspective, will ensure that any gender differences in treatment andaccess are eliminated". (Single Equality Scheme 2007-2010).1.5 It is clear that NHS commissioners have an obligation to provide services forpeople with gender dysphoria and that a policy for this should be formed inaccordance with the normal processes for policy formation and prioritisation. Referral Criteria5.1 The Primary Care Trust will only commission Gender Identity DisorderServices for patients who meet the following referral criteria:Inclusions• individuals with an initial diagnosis of transsexualism. A local consultantpsychiatrist who is not part of the gender identity service must have madethe initial diagnosis• patients who have written clinical support from their GP to ensure possiblefuture compliance with shared care arrangements if in place• the transsexual identity has been present persistently for at least twoyearsTreatment Pathway (Appendix A)Initial Assessment8.1 This period involves the continuation of the diagnostic assessment of thepatient.8.2 Psycho-social support should be available throughout the pathway.The Real Life Experience8.3 This is a period of time of two years, living in the gender role with which theindividual identifies, with the aim of assisting the patient and the professionalin decisions about how to proceed.8.4 The quality of real life experience is assessed through the patient’s ability to(Harry Benjamin Association, 2001):1. maintain employment, voluntary work, or education and training,2. acquire a legal gender appropriate first name3. demonstrate that people are aware that they are living in their newrole.Gender Reassignment Surgery (GRS)8.5 The treatment process for gender identity disorder includes a variety oftherapeutic options including surgical and non surgical procedures. Thetreatment pathway can include any of the following core treatments subject toexternal second opinion:Core Non Surgical Clinical Interventions• diagnostic assessment• psycho-social support• hormone therapy• pre- and post operative support from a professional with specialistknowledge of sex reassignment• voice skills therapy• Facial hair removal in transwomen, where clinically indicated toenable the period of real life experience8.6 The surgical interventions routinely funded under this policy can include oneor more of the following core procedures:Core Surgical Procedures for Gender Reassignment Surgery inTranswomen• penectomy• orchiectomy• vaginoplasty• clitoroplasty• labiaplasty• donor site hair removal on surgeon’s recommendationAny further procedure requested, including those listed below will require priorapproval. Cosmetic procedures require approval from the RestrictedTreatments Panel and are subject to the criteria of “exceptional clinical need”as defined in the Low Priority Treatments policy. Applications for otherprocedures should be made to the Exceptional Treatments Panel.Cosmetic Procedures• breast augmentation• reduction thyroid chondroplasty• rhinoplasty or other facial bone reduction• lipoplasty• blepharoplasty• face lift• liposuction• vocal chord surgery• Crico-thyroid approximation (only undertaken following speech &language therapy• hair removal/electrolysis (except as defined in core procedures)• procedures to decrease areas of baldness• skin resurfacingPost Operative Care8.8 Trans people are likely to have complex needs, be on lifelong hormonetherapy and may need to be monitored and have the services of amultidisciplinary team for the long term effects of such treatment such asthromboembolism, osteoporosis and cancer. Reassignment surgery usuallyleads to lower doses of hormones being required. GPs will be advised onhormone therapy by the tertiary centre, with referral of problems to the localtrust endocrinology services as required. Minor genitourinary tract problemscan be referred to the local urology department, but more complex problemsshould be referred to the specialist centre where reassignment surgery tookplace. However, both these issues will be part of normal treatment or carepathways managed by the Primary Care Trust.Reversal of Gender Reassignment Surgery8.9 The Primary Care Trust will not routinely provide funding for reversal ofGender Reassignment Surgery. Gender reassignment therapy/surgery isprovided following rigorous assessment of individual eligibility and readiness.This is intended to ensure that unsuitable patients are not offered surgery,leading to post operative regret.8.10 Revisions or repairs to surgery undertaken outside the NHS, wherever it hasoccurred, will not be approved or funded by the Primary Care Trust and thiswill include but not be exclusive to:• surgical revisions for psychological reasons• surgical revisions for cosmetic reasonsIn line with NHS co-funding guidance The Primary Care Trust will not cofund procedures nor will it support private non-core procedures being carriedout at the same time as core NHS funded procedures. This ensures there is aclear separation with regards to funding and liability. ____________________________________  Cristine Jennifer Shye B.acc. BL (GS Admin) 
    Mar 08, 2018 58

Top Blogs

  • 18 Dec 2014
    The Gender Clinic   2009 I had decided enough was enough. I needed help with this horrid transgendered curse which was doing its best to wreck my life. First stop GP. She was great. Second stop a selection of shrinks who referred me to the Gender Clinic as well as diagnosing me as pretty mental. First appointment was a long wait. But when it came it was quite nice being able to spill my guts out to an expert. I think I've been maybe 6 times now. During this period I've changed my name am dosed up on high levels of hormones and lifes great.   A Summary Of Yesterdays Appointment   I love hormones. The serenity from having near zero testosterone in my body. My bits don't work at all anymore which I couldn't care less about. I cannot be arsed with having my bits cut off and i don't like fannies anyway. I'm very single because I haven't got a clue about my sexual orientation and I'm not going to inflict that on anyone, but I do have a cat. People don't treat me as female, but they don't treat me as male either, i'm just different, which I like. I've had mainly very positive reactions to my gender choices. I am reintegrated into regular society. I'm no longer a webcam 'girl'.  My body has become very feminine which does confuse people. Sometimes I wear makeup and a hairpiece sometimes I don't, depends on my mood. Basically I'm a contented little tranny.   Bye Bye   So I'm exactly where I want to be with it all. The happiest I have been in years. So subsequently I have been told I don't have to go anymore. Their job is done, GP still deals with blood tests, hormones etc but thats it. I guess I'm what they would describe as a success story. So apart from one incident in there I have to say thanks to them as they have really helped me turn my life around.
    37 Posted by Mia Wallace
  • The Gender Clinic   2009 I had decided enough was enough. I needed help with this horrid transgendered curse which was doing its best to wreck my life. First stop GP. She was great. Second stop a selection of shrinks who referred me to the Gender Clinic as well as diagnosing me as pretty mental. First appointment was a long wait. But when it came it was quite nice being able to spill my guts out to an expert. I think I've been maybe 6 times now. During this period I've changed my name am dosed up on high levels of hormones and lifes great.   A Summary Of Yesterdays Appointment   I love hormones. The serenity from having near zero testosterone in my body. My bits don't work at all anymore which I couldn't care less about. I cannot be arsed with having my bits cut off and i don't like fannies anyway. I'm very single because I haven't got a clue about my sexual orientation and I'm not going to inflict that on anyone, but I do have a cat. People don't treat me as female, but they don't treat me as male either, i'm just different, which I like. I've had mainly very positive reactions to my gender choices. I am reintegrated into regular society. I'm no longer a webcam 'girl'.  My body has become very feminine which does confuse people. Sometimes I wear makeup and a hairpiece sometimes I don't, depends on my mood. Basically I'm a contented little tranny.   Bye Bye   So I'm exactly where I want to be with it all. The happiest I have been in years. So subsequently I have been told I don't have to go anymore. Their job is done, GP still deals with blood tests, hormones etc but thats it. I guess I'm what they would describe as a success story. So apart from one incident in there I have to say thanks to them as they have really helped me turn my life around.
    Dec 18, 2014 37
  • 13 Oct 2013
    Is it me?   Well not sure how to put this but here goes. Is it me or does anyone else feel that those who have gone through the full transition Don’t feel they fit in any more I have had 2 friends who have had the full transition and have left here Due to the way they are spoken to and both have a gone through what a lot of us are aiming to do And have great advice and are both counselling other trans girls in different stages of the journey I know they do as I do think in some way this fabulous site has taken a turn to more Fetish Cross Dressing which yes is all part of the trans scene in ways. 50 shades of grey doesn’t cut it here it’s more like 500 shades of grey lol But I do feel upset that friends and other post op girls who yes are now women feel they don’t belong I do say live and let live for all walks of life but it does come to a shock in ways to me that We have in a word discrimination against each other here Why can’t we all get along I have said before in the immortal words of high school musical   “We’re all in this together” so let’s start being united in what we do To quote a friend who has left “Peace love and lip gloss” Hugs xxamyxx 
    35 Posted by Amymichelle Morris
  • Is it me?   Well not sure how to put this but here goes. Is it me or does anyone else feel that those who have gone through the full transition Don’t feel they fit in any more I have had 2 friends who have had the full transition and have left here Due to the way they are spoken to and both have a gone through what a lot of us are aiming to do And have great advice and are both counselling other trans girls in different stages of the journey I know they do as I do think in some way this fabulous site has taken a turn to more Fetish Cross Dressing which yes is all part of the trans scene in ways. 50 shades of grey doesn’t cut it here it’s more like 500 shades of grey lol But I do feel upset that friends and other post op girls who yes are now women feel they don’t belong I do say live and let live for all walks of life but it does come to a shock in ways to me that We have in a word discrimination against each other here Why can’t we all get along I have said before in the immortal words of high school musical   “We’re all in this together” so let’s start being united in what we do To quote a friend who has left “Peace love and lip gloss” Hugs xxamyxx 
    Oct 13, 2013 35
  • 24 Jan 2014
    hi ya just asking i do love albumn suggestions and like looking at pics but please if ya have ya knob out please dont suggest as i like girly shots clothes and make up so you look nice a cock in stockings aint girly . i dont mind if you are into that and dressing is a fetish each to their own    live and let live i say  i dress because i love being a girl i know im a guy (a cock in a frock lol) but i like the illusion  thats why i tuck it away      but i cant or wont hit the like button because ya got ya dangleys out lol and i dont want to appear rude by not liking it so its best all round    big hugs and to coin a phrase a friend of mine uses   peace love and lipgloss xxxxxxx   xxamyxx
    31 Posted by Amymichelle Morris
  • hi ya just asking i do love albumn suggestions and like looking at pics but please if ya have ya knob out please dont suggest as i like girly shots clothes and make up so you look nice a cock in stockings aint girly . i dont mind if you are into that and dressing is a fetish each to their own    live and let live i say  i dress because i love being a girl i know im a guy (a cock in a frock lol) but i like the illusion  thats why i tuck it away      but i cant or wont hit the like button because ya got ya dangleys out lol and i dont want to appear rude by not liking it so its best all round    big hugs and to coin a phrase a friend of mine uses   peace love and lipgloss xxxxxxx   xxamyxx
    Jan 24, 2014 31
  • 14 Mar 2015
    Well today has been somewhat different for me, not only was it my mum's Birthday, but i also took her into The Village for a few drinks this afternoon and then onto velvet for a lovely Birthday meal, I had been promising to take her into Manchester for a long time - So I thought why not!  And yes before you ask, i was in girlie mode. Mum has known about Liz for quite a while now and is very comfortable with the Trans side of me and is always asking if I've bought any new clothes, and most of all hates how good my legs look! I chat to my mum everyday whether that is by text or a phone call, i always do, the thing is my mum like all of your parents and those close to you are not getting any younger, you should always grab the chance to speak to them whenever you can and spend as much time as you can with them. OK today was not the usual party atmosphere that we are accustomed to when we pop into the village on a Saturday, but more of a qualitiy precious time spent chatting in a relaxed environment with the woman who brought me into this world, helping "MUM" celebrate her birthday with Liz and not Ian.  Her words to me as I've just dropped her off at home " I have loved every second of today" like i said quality time.    Myself and Mum in Paddy's  And Mum enjoying another Cider in Via. So folks, wht not get yourselves off out and enjoy the preicous time while you can, you never know what's round the corner. Hugs  Liz and Marion (Mum) x
  • Well today has been somewhat different for me, not only was it my mum's Birthday, but i also took her into The Village for a few drinks this afternoon and then onto velvet for a lovely Birthday meal, I had been promising to take her into Manchester for a long time - So I thought why not!  And yes before you ask, i was in girlie mode. Mum has known about Liz for quite a while now and is very comfortable with the Trans side of me and is always asking if I've bought any new clothes, and most of all hates how good my legs look! I chat to my mum everyday whether that is by text or a phone call, i always do, the thing is my mum like all of your parents and those close to you are not getting any younger, you should always grab the chance to speak to them whenever you can and spend as much time as you can with them. OK today was not the usual party atmosphere that we are accustomed to when we pop into the village on a Saturday, but more of a qualitiy precious time spent chatting in a relaxed environment with the woman who brought me into this world, helping "MUM" celebrate her birthday with Liz and not Ian.  Her words to me as I've just dropped her off at home " I have loved every second of today" like i said quality time.    Myself and Mum in Paddy's  And Mum enjoying another Cider in Via. So folks, wht not get yourselves off out and enjoy the preicous time while you can, you never know what's round the corner. Hugs  Liz and Marion (Mum) x
    Mar 14, 2015 27
  • 16 Aug 2015
    Ok I know this blog isn't full of cock shots and all things kinky - but hey it is a little different! Yesterday myself and Shar went to a wedding reception and in my moment of madness I said "fuck it I'm going in girlie mode". So I started getting ready to the amusement of Shar, saying people won't know where to look, anyway I got ready and off we went, presant in hand. I wasn't feeling nervous, just good to be getting out again, although in a very straight and normal atmosphere. We arrived and I walk straight in greeted Sammy the bride and her new husband, to her amazement it was me Ian - but Liz! Having a mingle with the muggels and a chat to work colleagues, to my amazement no one actually read me apart from my work mates, who knew about Liz but had never actually met for real, apart from my ill fitting shoes being to big - yes to big I had a pleasant evening and it was a change from the norm! The moral to my blog is, if you dress with right attitude then why can't all of you lovely girls get out there and burst the bubble! Till next time, Hugs Liz x
  • Ok I know this blog isn't full of cock shots and all things kinky - but hey it is a little different! Yesterday myself and Shar went to a wedding reception and in my moment of madness I said "fuck it I'm going in girlie mode". So I started getting ready to the amusement of Shar, saying people won't know where to look, anyway I got ready and off we went, presant in hand. I wasn't feeling nervous, just good to be getting out again, although in a very straight and normal atmosphere. We arrived and I walk straight in greeted Sammy the bride and her new husband, to her amazement it was me Ian - but Liz! Having a mingle with the muggels and a chat to work colleagues, to my amazement no one actually read me apart from my work mates, who knew about Liz but had never actually met for real, apart from my ill fitting shoes being to big - yes to big I had a pleasant evening and it was a change from the norm! The moral to my blog is, if you dress with right attitude then why can't all of you lovely girls get out there and burst the bubble! Till next time, Hugs Liz x
    Aug 16, 2015 27
  • 26 Jul 2015
    Preparing for “D-Day” (“D” for “Disclosure”)   Stratford on Avon  May 2015  After Christmas I decided I was going to live out the rest of my life as a woman on a 24/7 basis.  I’m 70 next year and it was ‘now or never’.  For nearly 9 months I had been living as a woman at home and when out and about in the nearby towns but had not ‘come out’ to my friends and acquaintances in the village where I live.   I went dressed as a man when I disclosed my transgenderism to my (lady) doctor but took some photos with me, some dating back more than 50 years, so I could satisfy her this wasn’t just a recent phenomenon and that I hadn’t gone doolally because of my wife’s death early last year.   She was bowled over by the photos and asked me if I would give her make-up lessons so she could look 20 years younger too!    She immediately acceded to my request for a referral to the gender identity clinic (GIC) but then she had no option really, as there are strict NHS protocols and guidelines concerning transgender matters. As luck would have it, my local GIC was immediately next door in the ‘cottage’ hospital on the same campus as my doctor’s surgery; wasn’t I a lucky girl?  This hasn’t quickened up in the slightest the inordinately slow GIC process though.   She also changed my male name on the NHS records to that of my unofficially adopted female name and the NHS now only knows me as a female named Ms Trines Ward. All correspondence comes in that name. Any male doctor wishing to examine me must wheel in a female chaperone for my protection!  Recently I had an emergency operation and the hospital kept insisting I had to be put in a female ward; I only just managed to avoid this as I felt ill women and their visitors would not want to see me in the next bed without wig or make-up! In the male ward I wore androgynous pink and blue short pyjamas but the board above my bed clearly stated ‘Ms Trines Ward—female” as did the labels around my arm and ankle, and the staff punctiliously referred to me amongst staff and patients, as ‘she’ or ‘her’.   Back at the GIC, they informed me it was run by two psychiatrists and I would need a separate assessment consultation with each one before any treatment would be considered. There was a four months’ wait for each session which meant nothing could even begin to happen until October/November!  I thought this was completely out of order and I thoroughly read the two main published guidelines (both are on the net):   1. “Good practice guidelines for the assessment and treatment of adults with gender dysphoria” ref CR181 published by Royal College of Pyschiatrists Oct 2013   2) “Gender dysphoria services: a guide for General Practitioners and other healthcare staff” published by NHS.   These showed me my GIC’s timescales did not comply and some polite but firm letters and phone calls from me got the waits reduced to two months each; still lengthy but within the guidelines.  I can understand caution when dealing with tyros in their late teens/early twenties who might not even have ventured out dressed in public but not when dealing with very long in the tooth, fully experienced trans like me who know precisely where and how far they wish to go.   Both psychiatrists concluded I am fully transsexual and were happy to ‘take me all the way’. I’m not so sure. I’m not body dysphoric as far as my meat and two veg are concerned, in view of my age and recent bereavement I’m not seeking another partner, and neither am I gay so as Trines you might say I’m lesbian, so why would I want to lose my ‘wobbly bits’? I think I will be content to present myself as best I can as a woman even if I continue to have things in my knickers that other girls don’t have!  Provided I tuck no-one else will know whether I’ve had full reassignment or not.  What I want more than anything is feminising hormones so I can have effective facial and body hair removal and benefit from their desirable side-effects although at my age I cannot, unfortunately, expect oestrogen to give me any breast tissue   Meanwhile, I had to tell my three children and their families and then plan going fully public.   Whilst my wife ‘knew’ about me before we married, we agreed to keep it a secret from everyone for the protection both of our children and my wife from the substantial public opprobrium and ridicule they would have suffered, certainly back in the ‘70’s and ‘80’s. Indeed, on leaving home in the early 70’s I tried living full-time as a woman but had to give it up after 6 months because of the immense public hostility I suffered and the impossibility of getting a worthwhile job.   I now needed to inform my children of my condition and of my wish to ‘go public’. This would not be easy—and it wasn’t!  I paid for them to have quite expensive sessions with a counsellor experienced in transgender issues and this most definitely helped. All three of them are now fully supportive although my son, in particular, is still having trouble fully coming to terms with the ‘new’ me.  Fortunately there is a huge amount of love in my family and we will get there.   In 'Butch Biker Bitch' mode (Transtastic  photoshoot Feb 2015)   I have grandchildren by two of them and because they were all terribly upset by the death early last year of their granny, and they still are, my children do not want them to go through another bereavement because of the ‘loss’ of their granddad and neither do they want to risk them suffering cyber bullying so, for the time being at least, I have to be ‘granddad’ whenever I see them. I can do this wearing women’s shoes, trousers and tops so it is not too uncomfortable for me. It is a price I will pay if I have to.   With the children informed and ‘on board’ I was now, at long, long last  free to ‘go public’!  I had been planning this for several months as I wanted to try and ensure I would have the best possible result in terms of tolerance and acceptance by my local community.   I have lived in my fairly large village, population just over 2,000, for 15 years, 14 of those with my wife.  I have actively joined in with the local community, trying always to be nice to everyone, performing and directing with the drama society, secretary of the Twinning Association for many years, socialising in the four pubs, playing and umpiring for the cricket team, helping to organise village fetes etc.  In addition, I’ve always had a part-time job as deputy manager of the village’s very busy canal marina, selling boats and organising their big boat rallies and festivals. In addition, as a qualified Boat Master and passenger boat skipper, I give boat handling instruction throughout the inland waterways on my own account.   So I am very well known and, I like to think, well regarded  not only in the village but also through the large and widespread canal community. Coming out to all these many hundreds of people seemed to be a fearsome step to take, something I wasn’t sure I could manage.   I could of course always ‘cut and run’ by selling up, moving to a nice little house in a pleasant town somewhere, presenting myself immediately as Trines.  This way, I would not suffer any ridicule or shunning by people I knew. True. But the whole purpose of my fully transitioning was to be able to lead a full, entertaining and social life as Trines and to be accepted by and join in with my local community. If I moved away, I would not be known and, as an obvious transwoman, I would not make many new friends at all,.  I would be facing a rather lonely remainder of my life.   I didn’t struggle with this decision for very long, I bit the bullet and decided to openly disclose to my village; if it all went disastrously wrong then moving away would be my ‘Plan B’.   Family unity is so important to me I discussed every proposed step with my children and took on board all their suggestions. The doctor already knew, was professionally bound to secrecy and had got the NHS fully on side.   My next step was the vicar. I do have faith but for reasons I will not go into here had never attended the local church except for the occasional wedding and funeral. I knew her well through secular dealings and she had been fantastic over my wife’s funeral. I met her in male mode, told her I would like to start attending church services, that I wouldn’t mind singing in the choir (I knew they were desperately short and had no male voices at all) but there was just one tiny thing, I would be coming as a woman!  She was of course amazed by the news (my male persona is exceptionally masculine), bowled over by my photo’s and couldn’t wait to meet the real me which she did a few days later.   She was all for Trines being an active member of her congregation, brought her wardens confidentially on board for briefing on transgender matters so they could counsel any stroppy church members and got her bishop’s backing she could tell anyone who couldn’t freely accept me to clear off and find a different religion!  A target date of the first week in June was set and until then I would attend church and sing in the choir as a man and she would subliminally prepare everyone by seeding suitable comments about accepting and loving everyone regardless of their differences in the texts of her sermons, bidding prayers and in the Village News!   This now left me free to concentrate on my information leaflet. I had decided I would, the week before my transition, go round in drab to see every one of my friends and important acquaintances and tell them what I was proposing to do, show them some current and very historic photos if they wanted to see them, hope I could rely on their acceptance and continued friendship and leave them with an informative and illustrated leaflet which they could pass on to others if they wished.  This leaflet went through 6 or 7 draft stages and I was careful to include  things my children wanted said. I had 250 of these professionally printed on top quality, thick, glossy bi-folded A4  paper so they could easily withstand being passed around:- (if the type is too small to read, zoom in by pressing 'Ctrl' & '+' together):-   So the last week in May, the week before ‘D-Day’, arrived!   I went round telling all my friends and left them with a leaflet. I saw each pub licensee, leaving  half a dozen copies behind the bar as I was bound to be the village scandal for a few days and also got their promises that if any Neanderthals objected to my presence it would be them asked to leave the pub and not me. I had also booked a personal conference that week with my marina owner and his general manager. They had been on tenterhooks for weeks, fearful I was retiring or moving away. They seemed almost relieved when I told them Tony was becoming Trines, it was almost “Is that all? Thank God for that!” Subject to a private preview of the new me they were, as friends as well as equal opportunity employers, happy for me to continue in the role for them, dealing with the public. I’ve had to have new female uniforms bespoken as nothing off the peg was long enough and I made sure everything hugs my breast, waist and hips shapewear tightly. The office girls are green with envy as I look rather voluptuous and sexy—they have already demanded the same made to measure facility!   That Sunday I was not in church as I was managing the marina. The vicar took the opportunity of telling the congregation about me, how from the following week I would always be Trines,  and apparently spoke so beautifully and movingly on transgenderism  and why I should be embraced by them all,  there were quite a few damp eyes in the house. The wardens distributed my leaflets afterwards.    D - Day ! and its Aftermath   The following Monday, 1st June, Trines made her first public appearance in the village and Tony has never been seen since (except of course a couple of times down in London with the grandchildren).   Against all my fears and trepidation my public disclosure and transition has been an absolutely unbelievable success, beyond my wildest dreams.  I had told myself that if I could retain the goodwill of perhaps a third of my friends then that would be a good and acceptable result, making staying in the village worthwhile.  30%?  It’s greater than 100% as I now have more friends than before because of my transition!   People I’ve not seen before but who have read my leaflet or heard about me have been coming up in the street or pub to shake my hand, commend my bravery and to wish me luck!  I’ve had a rather nasty and emergency operation recently and news of this spread with the result that people, many of them my ’new’ friends, were falling over themselves, offering to drive me to and from hospital or to meet family at Rugby station and take them to visit me—a round trip of about 50 miles!   All my neighbours and friends are still very friendly, I can’t accept all the invites round for coffee etc, there are too many of them. I’m really welcome at church and am possibly the only lady bass in a church choir in the country! The church has put me on their fete committee and wants me to be the PA announcer and dog show commentator at the next one. I continue to work at the marina with no adverse feedback whatsoever from the public. I’ve recently been in charge of safety at the big annual historic boat rally, we get thousands of visitors each day, and had to go round telling loads of boat skippers and others what to do  (it’s like herding cats with them) - they all know me from previous years but if anything they were all nicer, friendlier and more compliant than they’ve ever been!  My boat training business has not dropped off in the slightest, no-one gives my transition a second thought when I inform them. The Twinning Association has asked me to prepare and present their next fund-raising quiz (a big annual event in the village). I’m cast in the next Players’ production, rehearsals start in September.  I’m very welcome in all four pubs and am never short of someone to chat to. I’ve been elected a member of a small, rather exclusive group of ladies who meet every few weeks to cattily swap the latest gossip and scandal whilst getting hammered on G&T!  I have even been asked if I would like to help out at the community-owned tea shop, serving coffee, cakes and conversation to villagers and passing boaters - which I will do after my current convalescence.   If anything my social life as Trines is better than it was for that person I used to be (what was his name?) and it wasn’t bad for him, so much so I think I am losing the need to meet up with my other trans friends as much as I used to. After all, there is nothing so satisfying as being accepted and socialised by ’normal’ people for the girl you are. I shall of course still get to Pink Punters occasionally as I will to Outskirts in Birmingham and come Hell or High Water I am definitely getting to Sparkle next year after it was so cruelly snatched from me this year by a cancerous tumour.   Those of you who’ve managed not to nod off but are still reading this and possibly thinking of transitioning yourselves at some time in the future, might like to have my views on why I think my public disclosure has been so successful.   1. I decided to brazen it out in the locality where I lived and was known, rather than move to a new location. Had it been necessary to move first then I might have delayed my local transition for a year or two so that I could get to know a fair number of people as a man. That would not, of course, have stopped me cross-dressing at home or from going out further afield in female mode.   2. I was well established and well-known in the locality, joined in community activities and, always trying to be a nice guy, I think I was generally well liked. Whilst having to come to terms with a friend’s transgenderism must be more difficult the better someone has known the person as a man, I think there may be that little more pressure to do so because they are a friend; if they were not or hardly known then, to avoid embarrassment or other difficulties I think people might be tempted to more or less ignore the trans, giving perhaps just a smile if meeting in the street.   3. I took my time and planned well!  I had been dressing almost every day since May 2014 at home and when out sight-seeing, shopping or socialising with other trans in towns near and far. I only presented as a man locally when I had to eg for a social function in my village or when I was working in the marina. By the end of the year the urge to go 24/7 was stronger than ever and I realised I had no option but to go for it and disclosed to my GP to get the GIC on my case. I then gave myself 6 months to prepare for ‘D-Day’ (‘Disclosure Day’).   Most reputable websites advise taking disclosure very slowly, telling only a few now, a few more in a couple of weeks and so on. This would not have suited my circumstances. It would have been highly confusing for villagers - and for me - to see me switching between Trines and Tony on a daily basis; it would have to be all, and this would be on 1st June. I brought the vicar on board for genuine reasons but she also was a sounding-board; if she and her wardens had been decidedly ‘iffy’ about it all I probably would have sounded out again with a friend on whom I could rely for discretion or possibly have decided to switch to Plan B (ie ‘cut & run’).   4. I prepared and distributed an information leaflet.   I had tremendously complimentary feedback; many thought this had been a master-stroke. Even a lot of my better educated friends confessed to knowing little or nothing about transgenderism despite the number of high profile cases reported in the press over recent months. They said they thought they would have been much less sympathetic over my situation and proposed actions had they not been able to read and think about it. Some said they would have simply put me down as a ’perv’!  My history dating back to age 4 was genuinely eye-opening to them and made them really want to help me through my transition. It also worked on people who did not know me.  I distributed just under 250 but I know a lot were passed around and perhaps some 500 villagers or more have seen and been quite affected by it. I strongly recommend anyone thinking of transitioning to prepare a similar leaflet.   5. Once I publicly transitioned I really ‘put myself about’.  I realised I would need to socialise as much as I could to reinforce my presence as Trines in the village and to get villagers talking to me. I made sure I visited each pub each week at a peak time. I attended village do’s, some of which I would never have gone to previously, just to make sure I was seen and for the chance to chat to others. I went on more walks around the village, canal and marina in order to meet lots of others. I invited many to my place for a coffee and chat which they either agreed to or invited me to theirs instead.  I will take this up again as soon as my convalescence permits me and rather nicely, I’ve had quite a few offers to mow my lawns and do other heavy household chores.   The inhabitants of my village have really come up trumps; their generosity of spirit has been truly humbling particularly when you consider that at 6ft 3in without heels (and I always wear heels!) a large, wide frame and a profoundly deep voice, I cannot easily 'pass'.   Whether, in view of my cancer, I will ever be allowed feminising hormones or will ever be offered re-assignment surgery has now paled into insignificance for me now that I am living and being widely accepted as the person I am.   I sincerely hope all other girls who publicly transition have family, friends and neighbours as lovely as mine to deal with.   All my love   x x  
    26 Posted by Trines x x
  • Preparing for “D-Day” (“D” for “Disclosure”)   Stratford on Avon  May 2015  After Christmas I decided I was going to live out the rest of my life as a woman on a 24/7 basis.  I’m 70 next year and it was ‘now or never’.  For nearly 9 months I had been living as a woman at home and when out and about in the nearby towns but had not ‘come out’ to my friends and acquaintances in the village where I live.   I went dressed as a man when I disclosed my transgenderism to my (lady) doctor but took some photos with me, some dating back more than 50 years, so I could satisfy her this wasn’t just a recent phenomenon and that I hadn’t gone doolally because of my wife’s death early last year.   She was bowled over by the photos and asked me if I would give her make-up lessons so she could look 20 years younger too!    She immediately acceded to my request for a referral to the gender identity clinic (GIC) but then she had no option really, as there are strict NHS protocols and guidelines concerning transgender matters. As luck would have it, my local GIC was immediately next door in the ‘cottage’ hospital on the same campus as my doctor’s surgery; wasn’t I a lucky girl?  This hasn’t quickened up in the slightest the inordinately slow GIC process though.   She also changed my male name on the NHS records to that of my unofficially adopted female name and the NHS now only knows me as a female named Ms Trines Ward. All correspondence comes in that name. Any male doctor wishing to examine me must wheel in a female chaperone for my protection!  Recently I had an emergency operation and the hospital kept insisting I had to be put in a female ward; I only just managed to avoid this as I felt ill women and their visitors would not want to see me in the next bed without wig or make-up! In the male ward I wore androgynous pink and blue short pyjamas but the board above my bed clearly stated ‘Ms Trines Ward—female” as did the labels around my arm and ankle, and the staff punctiliously referred to me amongst staff and patients, as ‘she’ or ‘her’.   Back at the GIC, they informed me it was run by two psychiatrists and I would need a separate assessment consultation with each one before any treatment would be considered. There was a four months’ wait for each session which meant nothing could even begin to happen until October/November!  I thought this was completely out of order and I thoroughly read the two main published guidelines (both are on the net):   1. “Good practice guidelines for the assessment and treatment of adults with gender dysphoria” ref CR181 published by Royal College of Pyschiatrists Oct 2013   2) “Gender dysphoria services: a guide for General Practitioners and other healthcare staff” published by NHS.   These showed me my GIC’s timescales did not comply and some polite but firm letters and phone calls from me got the waits reduced to two months each; still lengthy but within the guidelines.  I can understand caution when dealing with tyros in their late teens/early twenties who might not even have ventured out dressed in public but not when dealing with very long in the tooth, fully experienced trans like me who know precisely where and how far they wish to go.   Both psychiatrists concluded I am fully transsexual and were happy to ‘take me all the way’. I’m not so sure. I’m not body dysphoric as far as my meat and two veg are concerned, in view of my age and recent bereavement I’m not seeking another partner, and neither am I gay so as Trines you might say I’m lesbian, so why would I want to lose my ‘wobbly bits’? I think I will be content to present myself as best I can as a woman even if I continue to have things in my knickers that other girls don’t have!  Provided I tuck no-one else will know whether I’ve had full reassignment or not.  What I want more than anything is feminising hormones so I can have effective facial and body hair removal and benefit from their desirable side-effects although at my age I cannot, unfortunately, expect oestrogen to give me any breast tissue   Meanwhile, I had to tell my three children and their families and then plan going fully public.   Whilst my wife ‘knew’ about me before we married, we agreed to keep it a secret from everyone for the protection both of our children and my wife from the substantial public opprobrium and ridicule they would have suffered, certainly back in the ‘70’s and ‘80’s. Indeed, on leaving home in the early 70’s I tried living full-time as a woman but had to give it up after 6 months because of the immense public hostility I suffered and the impossibility of getting a worthwhile job.   I now needed to inform my children of my condition and of my wish to ‘go public’. This would not be easy—and it wasn’t!  I paid for them to have quite expensive sessions with a counsellor experienced in transgender issues and this most definitely helped. All three of them are now fully supportive although my son, in particular, is still having trouble fully coming to terms with the ‘new’ me.  Fortunately there is a huge amount of love in my family and we will get there.   In 'Butch Biker Bitch' mode (Transtastic  photoshoot Feb 2015)   I have grandchildren by two of them and because they were all terribly upset by the death early last year of their granny, and they still are, my children do not want them to go through another bereavement because of the ‘loss’ of their granddad and neither do they want to risk them suffering cyber bullying so, for the time being at least, I have to be ‘granddad’ whenever I see them. I can do this wearing women’s shoes, trousers and tops so it is not too uncomfortable for me. It is a price I will pay if I have to.   With the children informed and ‘on board’ I was now, at long, long last  free to ‘go public’!  I had been planning this for several months as I wanted to try and ensure I would have the best possible result in terms of tolerance and acceptance by my local community.   I have lived in my fairly large village, population just over 2,000, for 15 years, 14 of those with my wife.  I have actively joined in with the local community, trying always to be nice to everyone, performing and directing with the drama society, secretary of the Twinning Association for many years, socialising in the four pubs, playing and umpiring for the cricket team, helping to organise village fetes etc.  In addition, I’ve always had a part-time job as deputy manager of the village’s very busy canal marina, selling boats and organising their big boat rallies and festivals. In addition, as a qualified Boat Master and passenger boat skipper, I give boat handling instruction throughout the inland waterways on my own account.   So I am very well known and, I like to think, well regarded  not only in the village but also through the large and widespread canal community. Coming out to all these many hundreds of people seemed to be a fearsome step to take, something I wasn’t sure I could manage.   I could of course always ‘cut and run’ by selling up, moving to a nice little house in a pleasant town somewhere, presenting myself immediately as Trines.  This way, I would not suffer any ridicule or shunning by people I knew. True. But the whole purpose of my fully transitioning was to be able to lead a full, entertaining and social life as Trines and to be accepted by and join in with my local community. If I moved away, I would not be known and, as an obvious transwoman, I would not make many new friends at all,.  I would be facing a rather lonely remainder of my life.   I didn’t struggle with this decision for very long, I bit the bullet and decided to openly disclose to my village; if it all went disastrously wrong then moving away would be my ‘Plan B’.   Family unity is so important to me I discussed every proposed step with my children and took on board all their suggestions. The doctor already knew, was professionally bound to secrecy and had got the NHS fully on side.   My next step was the vicar. I do have faith but for reasons I will not go into here had never attended the local church except for the occasional wedding and funeral. I knew her well through secular dealings and she had been fantastic over my wife’s funeral. I met her in male mode, told her I would like to start attending church services, that I wouldn’t mind singing in the choir (I knew they were desperately short and had no male voices at all) but there was just one tiny thing, I would be coming as a woman!  She was of course amazed by the news (my male persona is exceptionally masculine), bowled over by my photo’s and couldn’t wait to meet the real me which she did a few days later.   She was all for Trines being an active member of her congregation, brought her wardens confidentially on board for briefing on transgender matters so they could counsel any stroppy church members and got her bishop’s backing she could tell anyone who couldn’t freely accept me to clear off and find a different religion!  A target date of the first week in June was set and until then I would attend church and sing in the choir as a man and she would subliminally prepare everyone by seeding suitable comments about accepting and loving everyone regardless of their differences in the texts of her sermons, bidding prayers and in the Village News!   This now left me free to concentrate on my information leaflet. I had decided I would, the week before my transition, go round in drab to see every one of my friends and important acquaintances and tell them what I was proposing to do, show them some current and very historic photos if they wanted to see them, hope I could rely on their acceptance and continued friendship and leave them with an informative and illustrated leaflet which they could pass on to others if they wished.  This leaflet went through 6 or 7 draft stages and I was careful to include  things my children wanted said. I had 250 of these professionally printed on top quality, thick, glossy bi-folded A4  paper so they could easily withstand being passed around:- (if the type is too small to read, zoom in by pressing 'Ctrl' & '+' together):-   So the last week in May, the week before ‘D-Day’, arrived!   I went round telling all my friends and left them with a leaflet. I saw each pub licensee, leaving  half a dozen copies behind the bar as I was bound to be the village scandal for a few days and also got their promises that if any Neanderthals objected to my presence it would be them asked to leave the pub and not me. I had also booked a personal conference that week with my marina owner and his general manager. They had been on tenterhooks for weeks, fearful I was retiring or moving away. They seemed almost relieved when I told them Tony was becoming Trines, it was almost “Is that all? Thank God for that!” Subject to a private preview of the new me they were, as friends as well as equal opportunity employers, happy for me to continue in the role for them, dealing with the public. I’ve had to have new female uniforms bespoken as nothing off the peg was long enough and I made sure everything hugs my breast, waist and hips shapewear tightly. The office girls are green with envy as I look rather voluptuous and sexy—they have already demanded the same made to measure facility!   That Sunday I was not in church as I was managing the marina. The vicar took the opportunity of telling the congregation about me, how from the following week I would always be Trines,  and apparently spoke so beautifully and movingly on transgenderism  and why I should be embraced by them all,  there were quite a few damp eyes in the house. The wardens distributed my leaflets afterwards.    D - Day ! and its Aftermath   The following Monday, 1st June, Trines made her first public appearance in the village and Tony has never been seen since (except of course a couple of times down in London with the grandchildren).   Against all my fears and trepidation my public disclosure and transition has been an absolutely unbelievable success, beyond my wildest dreams.  I had told myself that if I could retain the goodwill of perhaps a third of my friends then that would be a good and acceptable result, making staying in the village worthwhile.  30%?  It’s greater than 100% as I now have more friends than before because of my transition!   People I’ve not seen before but who have read my leaflet or heard about me have been coming up in the street or pub to shake my hand, commend my bravery and to wish me luck!  I’ve had a rather nasty and emergency operation recently and news of this spread with the result that people, many of them my ’new’ friends, were falling over themselves, offering to drive me to and from hospital or to meet family at Rugby station and take them to visit me—a round trip of about 50 miles!   All my neighbours and friends are still very friendly, I can’t accept all the invites round for coffee etc, there are too many of them. I’m really welcome at church and am possibly the only lady bass in a church choir in the country! The church has put me on their fete committee and wants me to be the PA announcer and dog show commentator at the next one. I continue to work at the marina with no adverse feedback whatsoever from the public. I’ve recently been in charge of safety at the big annual historic boat rally, we get thousands of visitors each day, and had to go round telling loads of boat skippers and others what to do  (it’s like herding cats with them) - they all know me from previous years but if anything they were all nicer, friendlier and more compliant than they’ve ever been!  My boat training business has not dropped off in the slightest, no-one gives my transition a second thought when I inform them. The Twinning Association has asked me to prepare and present their next fund-raising quiz (a big annual event in the village). I’m cast in the next Players’ production, rehearsals start in September.  I’m very welcome in all four pubs and am never short of someone to chat to. I’ve been elected a member of a small, rather exclusive group of ladies who meet every few weeks to cattily swap the latest gossip and scandal whilst getting hammered on G&T!  I have even been asked if I would like to help out at the community-owned tea shop, serving coffee, cakes and conversation to villagers and passing boaters - which I will do after my current convalescence.   If anything my social life as Trines is better than it was for that person I used to be (what was his name?) and it wasn’t bad for him, so much so I think I am losing the need to meet up with my other trans friends as much as I used to. After all, there is nothing so satisfying as being accepted and socialised by ’normal’ people for the girl you are. I shall of course still get to Pink Punters occasionally as I will to Outskirts in Birmingham and come Hell or High Water I am definitely getting to Sparkle next year after it was so cruelly snatched from me this year by a cancerous tumour.   Those of you who’ve managed not to nod off but are still reading this and possibly thinking of transitioning yourselves at some time in the future, might like to have my views on why I think my public disclosure has been so successful.   1. I decided to brazen it out in the locality where I lived and was known, rather than move to a new location. Had it been necessary to move first then I might have delayed my local transition for a year or two so that I could get to know a fair number of people as a man. That would not, of course, have stopped me cross-dressing at home or from going out further afield in female mode.   2. I was well established and well-known in the locality, joined in community activities and, always trying to be a nice guy, I think I was generally well liked. Whilst having to come to terms with a friend’s transgenderism must be more difficult the better someone has known the person as a man, I think there may be that little more pressure to do so because they are a friend; if they were not or hardly known then, to avoid embarrassment or other difficulties I think people might be tempted to more or less ignore the trans, giving perhaps just a smile if meeting in the street.   3. I took my time and planned well!  I had been dressing almost every day since May 2014 at home and when out sight-seeing, shopping or socialising with other trans in towns near and far. I only presented as a man locally when I had to eg for a social function in my village or when I was working in the marina. By the end of the year the urge to go 24/7 was stronger than ever and I realised I had no option but to go for it and disclosed to my GP to get the GIC on my case. I then gave myself 6 months to prepare for ‘D-Day’ (‘Disclosure Day’).   Most reputable websites advise taking disclosure very slowly, telling only a few now, a few more in a couple of weeks and so on. This would not have suited my circumstances. It would have been highly confusing for villagers - and for me - to see me switching between Trines and Tony on a daily basis; it would have to be all, and this would be on 1st June. I brought the vicar on board for genuine reasons but she also was a sounding-board; if she and her wardens had been decidedly ‘iffy’ about it all I probably would have sounded out again with a friend on whom I could rely for discretion or possibly have decided to switch to Plan B (ie ‘cut & run’).   4. I prepared and distributed an information leaflet.   I had tremendously complimentary feedback; many thought this had been a master-stroke. Even a lot of my better educated friends confessed to knowing little or nothing about transgenderism despite the number of high profile cases reported in the press over recent months. They said they thought they would have been much less sympathetic over my situation and proposed actions had they not been able to read and think about it. Some said they would have simply put me down as a ’perv’!  My history dating back to age 4 was genuinely eye-opening to them and made them really want to help me through my transition. It also worked on people who did not know me.  I distributed just under 250 but I know a lot were passed around and perhaps some 500 villagers or more have seen and been quite affected by it. I strongly recommend anyone thinking of transitioning to prepare a similar leaflet.   5. Once I publicly transitioned I really ‘put myself about’.  I realised I would need to socialise as much as I could to reinforce my presence as Trines in the village and to get villagers talking to me. I made sure I visited each pub each week at a peak time. I attended village do’s, some of which I would never have gone to previously, just to make sure I was seen and for the chance to chat to others. I went on more walks around the village, canal and marina in order to meet lots of others. I invited many to my place for a coffee and chat which they either agreed to or invited me to theirs instead.  I will take this up again as soon as my convalescence permits me and rather nicely, I’ve had quite a few offers to mow my lawns and do other heavy household chores.   The inhabitants of my village have really come up trumps; their generosity of spirit has been truly humbling particularly when you consider that at 6ft 3in without heels (and I always wear heels!) a large, wide frame and a profoundly deep voice, I cannot easily 'pass'.   Whether, in view of my cancer, I will ever be allowed feminising hormones or will ever be offered re-assignment surgery has now paled into insignificance for me now that I am living and being widely accepted as the person I am.   I sincerely hope all other girls who publicly transition have family, friends and neighbours as lovely as mine to deal with.   All my love   x x  
    Jul 26, 2015 26